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NASA renews its agreement to search for Antarctic meteorites

NASA, The National Science Foundation (NSF) And The Smithsonian Institution (SI) Recently Renewed Their Agreement To Search For, Collect And Curate Antarctic Meteorites In A Partnership Known As ANSMET

News Nation Bureau | Edited By : Neha Singh | Updated on: 17 Nov 2016, 12:05:04 PM
 NASA renews its agreement to search for Antarctic meteorites (Image: Getty)

New Delhi:

To learn more and in details about the primitive building blocks of the solar system and about Earths neighbours like the moon and Mars, three federal entities in the US, including NASA, are reaffirming their commitment to search for Antarctic meteorites.

NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the Smithsonian Institution (SI) recently renewed their agreement to search for, collect and curate Antarctic meteorites in a partnership known as ANSMET — the Antarctic Search for Meteorites Program, the US space agency said in a statement.

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The signing of this new joint agreement advances the programme for an additional decade, replacing an earlier agreement signed in 1980. 

”Antarctic meteorites are posing new questions about the formation and early history of our solar system. Some of these questions are spurring new exploration of the solar system by NASA missions,” Smithsonian meteorite scientist Tim McCoy said. 

Antarctic meteorites are posing new questions about the formation and early history of our solar system. Some of these questions are spurring new exploration of the solar system by NASA missions,” Smithsonian meteorite scientist Tim McCoy said.

Since the U.S. began searching for meteorites in Antarctica in 1976, the ANSMET programme has collected more than 23,000 specimens, dramatically increasing the number of samples available for study from the Moon, Mars and asteroids.

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First Published : 17 Nov 2016, 11:56:00 AM

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Antartica Meteorites